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:: Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions about ALL Marie Curie Actions

- Initial Training Networks (ITN)

- Intra - European Fellowship (IEF)

- European Reintegration Grants (ERG)

- Industry - Academia Partnerships & Pathways (IAPP)

- International Outgoing Fellowships (IOF)

- International Incoming Fellwoships (IIF)

- International Reintegration Grants (IRG)

- International Research Staff Exchange Scheme (IRSES)

- Researcher's Nigth (NIGHT)

- Marie-Curie Awards (AWARDS)

- Initial Training Networks (ITN)

What are Marie Curie Initial Training Networks?
Marie Curie Initial Training Networks are aimed at improving the career perspectives of researchers who are in the first five years of their career by offering structured training in well defined scientific and/or technological areas as well as providing complementary skills and exposing the researchers to other sectors including private companies.

Who can apply?
Normally, a network will comprise at least three participants (e.g. universities, research organisations, industrial firms, SME's, international organisations) proposing a coherent and integrated research training programme. However, in certain cases single or twinning host organisations may also be eligible.

Which research topics are supported?
Proposals from all areas of scientific and technological research of interest to the European Community are welcome and there are no pre-defined priority areas. However, activities in areas covered by the EURATOM treaty are not eligible.

How does it work?
Networks will be selected competitively following a two-stage evaluation process. Successful proposals will be invited to enter into grant agreement negotiations with the Commission in order to define the implementation of the project in more detail, also taking into account the experts' comments made during the evaluation, and to finalise the budget. Researchers can be appointed from the start date of the project mentioned in the grant agreement. An advance payment is made at the beginning of the project; subsequent annual payments are released upon acceptance of the annual reports.

What does the funding cover?
Funding is primarily provided for the benefit of the researchers appointed by the host (including their living allowances, travel expenses etc). There is also a contribution to expenses linked to the execution of the project in the host organisation, along with a contribution towards overheads and management related expenses.

How to apply?
This Guide for proposers contains the essential information for you to prepare and submit a proposal for a Marie Curie Initial Training Network. You should also consult the relevant legal documents (listed in the Annex 1 of the Guide for proposers) in order to better understand the evaluation process, rules of participation, contractual and financial issues, etc. Proposals are submitted electronically via the Commission's Electronic Proposal Submission Service (EPSS).

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- Intra - European Fellowship (IEF)

What are Intra-European fellowships for career development?
This action aims at supporting experienced researchers at various stages of their career, helping them in acquiring new research skills (multi or interdisciplinary) or to undertake inter-sectoral experiences.

Who can apply?
Researchers from a Member State (MS) or Associated State (AS) or assimilated state who at the date of the deadline are in possession of a doctoral degree, or having at least 4 years of full-time equivalent research experience after obtaining the degree allowing them to embark on a doctorate.

Which research topics are supported?
All Marie Curie actions have a bottom-up approach, i.e. research fields are chosen freely by the applicants. All domains of research and technological development addressed under the EC Treaty are eligible for funding (except EURATOM, see http://cordis.europa.eu/fp7/euratom) are welcome.

How does it work?
Proposals are submitted jointly by the host organisation and the individual researcher, within the specified deadlines, and are evaluated by external independent experts against a series of predetermined criteria. Financial support will be provided to the proposals selected by the Commission, for a period of 12 to 24 months full-time equivalents (FTEs).

What does the funding cover?
Funding is provided for advanced training (including complementary skills) and trans-national mobility, on the basis of the "personal career development plan" established by the researcher with her/his personal supervisor in the host organisation. It includes in particular a salary for the researcher and a contribution towards research-related costs.

How much funding is involved per fellowship?
This Community contribution depends on several parameters including the researcher's level of experience and family situation, the country where the host is located, and whether it is a laboratory based project or not.

How to apply?
This Guide contains the essential information for you to prepare and submit a proposal for Intra-European Fellowships for career development. You should also consult the relevant legal documents in order to better understand the evaluation process, rules of participation, contractual and financial issues, etc. Proposals are submitted electronically via the Commission's Electronic Proposal Submission Service (EPSS).

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- European Reintegration Grants (ERG)

What are Marie Curie European Reintegration Grants (ERG)?
They are actions offering the opportunity to experienced researchers from Member States or Associated countries, to capitalise on their transnational mobility period after having participated in a Marie Curie Action either under the Seventh or the previous Framework Programme. The mechanism will assist the professional (re)integration of the eligible researchers in a research organisation in a Member State or Associated country, including in the country of their nationality. The duration of these grants is between 2 and 3 years.

Who can apply?
A researcher from EU Member States or Associated countries with at least 4 years full-time postgraduate research experience or a doctoral degree, independently of the time taken to acquire it. S/he should benefit at the time of application or should have previously benefited from a training and mobility action under the Seventh or the Sixth Framework Programme with duration of at least 18 months (Full time equivalent). The researcher applies in liaison with the (re)integration host organisation. Eligible hosts are organisations active in research or research training (e.g. universities, research centres, international organisations, enterprises, etc.).

Which research topics are supported?
This Action is open to all areas of scientific and technological research addressed under the EC treaty. Research fields can be chosen freely by the applicants in a bottom-up manner. However, activities in areas covered by the EURATOM treaty are not eligible.

How does it work?
The researcher submits a proposal for a research project to the Commission jointly with the (re)integration host organisation. The proposal has to be submitted at the earliest one year before the end of the initial Marie Curie fellowship and not later than six months following its end. The execution of the project must start at the latest 12 months after the end of the initial fellowship. Applications can be submitted continuously and will be evaluated and selected twice a year on the basis of the cut-off dates indicated in the call. If the proposal is selected, the Commission signs a grant agreement with the (re)integration host. The (re)integration host will then sign an employment agreement with the researcher.

What does the funding cover?
The grant is a flat-rate contribution to the project costs, e.g. salary costs of the researchers or other staff employed for the project, travel cost, consumables, patent or publication costs etc.

How much funding is involved per fellowship?
The Community contribution is a fixed amount of €15000 per year during the period of reintegration and up to a maximum period of 3 years.

How to apply?
This Guide for proposers for the ERG action contains the essential information for you to prepare and submit a proposal for a Marie Curie European Reintegration Grant. You should also consult the relevant legal documents (listed in the Annex 1 of this Guide for proposers) in order to better understand the evaluation process, rules of participation, contractual and financial issues, etc. Proposals are submitted electronically via the Commission's Electronic Proposal Submission Service (EPSS).

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- Industry - Academia Partnerships & Pathways (IAPP)

What are Marie Curie Industry-Academia Partnerships and Pathways (IAPP)?
IAPPs are partnerships between public and private research organisations (including universities, large and small enterprises, manufacturing industries), based on a common research project and aiming to increase skills exchange between the two sectors.

Who can apply?
Proposals must include as a minimum one organisation from each sector. The participating organisations must be established in at least two different Member States or Associated Countries of which at least one must be a Member State. There is no pre-defined maximum number of participants.

Which research topics are supported?
There are no pre-defined priority areas. Research fields are chosen freely by the applicants and all domains of research and technological development addressed under the EC Treaty are eligible for funding (except areas of research covered by the EURATOM Treaty).

How does it work?
Proposals are submitted, evaluated against a series of predetermined criteria by international peer review and selected for funding, typically for 4 years.

Who can be appointed in a network?
Research staff and technical & managerial staff of all levels of experience are eligible for secondments within the IAPP scheme. Furthermore experienced researchers are eligible for new recruitment by the IAPP partners. Seconded and recruited researchers can be of any nationality. However, typically recruited researchers cannot be from the country of the host organisation.
Available positions will be published by the partnership, notably on ERACAREERS: http://ec.europa.eu/eracareers/index_en.cfm. Applicants should contact the partnership directly.

What does the funding cover?
Support will be provided for:

  • Exchange of know-how and experience through inter-sector two-ways secondments of research staff of the participants;
  • Research and Networking activities;

optionally:

  • Recruitment of experienced researchers from outside the partnership, for involvement in transfer of knowledge and/or training of researchers;
  • Organisation of workshops and conferences, involving the participants' own research staff and external researchers

How to apply?
The ''Guide for Applicants'' contains the essential information for you to prepare and submit a proposal within the Marie Curie Industry-Academia Partnerships and Pathways scheme. You should also consult the relevant legal documents in order to better understand the evaluation process, rules of participation, contractual and financial issues, etc. Proposals are submitted electronically via the Commission's Electronic Proposal Submission Service (EPSS). Detailed instructions are available in the Guide for Applicants.

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- International Outgoing Fellowships (IOF)

What are Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowships for Career Development?
This action aims at offering the European researchers the opportunity to be trained and to acquire new knowledge in a third country high-level research organisation, and subsequently return to an organisation in a Member State (MS) or Associated State (AS).

Who can apply?
Researchers from a Member State (MS) or Associated Country (AC), who at the date of the deadline are in possession of a doctoral degree and with at least 4 years full-time equivalent research experience after obtaining the degree which allows them to embark on a doctorate. (Full eligibility criteria are provided in Annex 2 of this Guide)

Which research topics are supported?
All Marie Curie actions have a bottom-up approach, i.e. research fields are chosen freely by the applicants. All domains of research and technological development addressed under the EC Treaty are eligible for funding (except EURATOM, see http://cordis.europa.eu/fp7/euratom) are welcome.

How does it work?
Proposals are submitted jointly by the (European) host organisation and the individual researcher within the specified deadlines. Eligible proposals are evaluated by external independent experts against a series of predetermined criteria. Financial support will be provided to the selected proposals for a period of up to 3 years, including an initial outgoing phase (1-2 years, full-time equivalents, FTE) in a third country and a mandatory reintegration phase (1 year)

What does the funding cover?
Funding is provided for advanced training on the basis of the "personal career development plan". It includes in particular a salary for the researcher and a contribution towards research-related costs.

How much funding is involved per fellowship?
This Community contribution depends on several parameters including the researcher's level of experience and family situation, the countries where the training research activities will be carried out, and whether it is a laboratory-based project or not.

How to apply?
The ''Guide for Applicants'' contains the essential information for you to prepare and submit a proposal for a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship for Career Development (IOF). You should also consult the relevant legal documents in order to better understand the evaluation process, rules of participation, contractual and financial issues, etc. Proposals are submitted electronically via the Commission's Electronic Proposal Submission Service (EPSS). Detailed instructions are available in the Guide for Applicants.

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- International Incoming Fellwoships (IIF)

What are International Incoming Fellowships ?
They are individual fellowships that aim to attract top-class researchers from third countries to work and undertake research training in Europe from 1 to 2 years (incoming phase), with a view to developing mutually-beneficial research co-operation. In the case of emerging and transition economies and developing countries, the scheme may assist fellows to return to their country of origin for, typically, half the duration of the first phase (re-integration phase).

Who can apply?
Researchers with the nationality of any third country, and who at the date of the deadline are in possession of a doctoral degree or having at least 4 years of full-time equivalent research experience after obtaining the degree allowing them to embark on a doctorate. (Full eligibility criteria are provided in Annex 2 of the ''Guide for Applicants'')

Which research topics are supported?
All Marie Curie actions have a bottom-up approach, i.e. research fields are chosen freely by the applicants. All domains of research and technological development addressed under the EC Treaty are eligible for funding (except EURATOM, see http://cordis.europa.eu/fp7/euratom) are welcome.

How does it work?
Following the publication of a call for proposals, proposals are submitted jointly by the host organisation and the individual researcher l and (if applicable and allowed) with a re-integration host in a third country - within the specified deadlines are evaluated by external independent experts against a series of predetermined criteria. Financial support will be provided to the best proposals for a period of 12 to 24 months (full-time equivalent, FTE), plus an eventual return phase of 12 months.

What does the funding cover?
Funding is provided to cover the expenses related to the researcher and the project. During the incoming phase, it includes a salary for the researcher and an allowance for the costs related to travel and mobility, as well as a contribution towards research-related costs. Additionally, the host receives contributions to overheads and management costs. During the re-integration phase, the grant is to be used as a contribution to the scientific costs related to the researcher's project at the re-integration host, on a real cost basis and with a maximum ceiling.

How much funding is involved per fellowship?
The Community contribution depends on several parameters: the researcher's level of experience, the countries where the research training activities will be carried out, the researcher's family situation and whether it is a laboratory based project or not.

How to apply?
This Guide contains the essential information for you to prepare and submit a proposal for an International Incoming Fellowship (IIF). You should also consult the relevant legal documents (Annex 1, Guide for Applicants) in order to better understand the evaluation process, rules of participation, contractual and financial issues, etc. Proposals are submitted electronically via the Commission's Electronic Proposal Submission Service (EPSS). Detailed instructions are available in this Guide.

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- International Reintegration Grants (IRG)

What are the Marie Curie International Reintegration Grants ?
They are actions to reinforce the attractiveness of Europe by encouraging European researchers who have carried out research outside Europe for at least 3 years, to reintegrate in a Member State or in an Associated country in order to contribute to
European research and transfer the knowledge they have acquired in a third country, by offering them the opportunity to capitalise in Europe on their experience. It is aimed at countering European brain drain to third countries. It should also allow the development of lasting co-operation with the scientific and/or industrial environment of the third country from which they have returned

Who can apply?
This action will be open to experienced researchers from the Member States or Associated countries, who at the date of submission as foreseen in the call for proposals have been active in research in a third country for at least 3 years and who will return to a Member State or Associated country.

Which research topics are supported?
Proposals from all areas of scientific and technological research of interest to the European Community are welcome and there are no priority areas. However, activities in areas covered by the EURATOM treaty are not eligible.

How does it work?
Applications can be submitted continuously and will be evaluated and selected at regular intervals, based on cut-off dates, from the date of publication of the call. For selected projects a contract is issued with the (re)integration host organisation, which will commit itself to assure an effective and lasting professional integration of the researcher for a period of at least 2 and up to 4 years

What does the funding cover?
The grant is a flat-rate contribution to the salary costs of the researcher, and/or to the research costs relating to the researcher's project at the reintegration host, such as salary costs of other staff (e.g. assistants, technicians), travel costs, consumables, patent costs and publication costs.

How much funding is involved per fellowship?
The Community contribution amounts to 25.000€ per researcher/year during the
period of reintegration of at least 2 and up to a max. of 4 years

How to apply?
This Guide contains the essential information for you to prepare and submit a proposal for a Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant. You should also consult the relevant legal documents (listed in the Annex 1 of this document) in order to better understand the evaluation process, rules of participation, contractual and financial issues, etc. Proposals are submitted electronically via the Commission's Electronic Proposal Submission Service (EPSS).

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- International Research Staff Exchange Scheme (IRSES)

What is IRSES?
The Marie Curie International Research Staff Exchange Scheme aims at strengthening research partnerships through short period staff exchanges and networking activities between European research organisations and organisations from countries with which the Community has an S&T agreement or are in the process of negotiating one13, and countries covered by the European Neighbourhood policy.

Who can apply?
Public or private bodies which carry out research can participate in this action. A partnership in this action shall be composed of at least two independent participants established in at least two different EU Member States (MS) or Associated countries (AC), and one or more organisation(s) located either in countries with which the EU has an S&T Agreement or in countries covered by the European Neighbourhood Policy. One of the MS/AC partners will be the coordinator of the project.

Which research topics are supported?
All Marie Curie actions have a bottom-up approach, i.e. research fields are chosen freely by the applicants. All domains of research and technological development addressed under the EC Treaty are eligible for funding, except areas of research covered by the EURATOM Treaty (http://europa.eu/scadplus/treaties/euratom_en.htm).

How does it work?
Proposals are submitted within the specified deadlines, and are evaluated by external independent experts against a series of predetermined criteria. A staff exchange programme can apply for Community support for a period of 24-48 months. The maximum duration of the individual staff exchanges will be 12 months.

What does the funding cover?
For each member of staff from an EU Member State or Associated country staying in an eligible Third Country, the Community will pay a subsistence allowance for the additional mobility costs of €1,800 per month (including travel costs). In exceptional cases, the costs of stays of staff from certain Third countries in Europe may also be covered (for details see p.12). In all cases, the staff must remain employed by their organisations and are expected to return after the mobility period.

How to apply?
This Guide contains the essential information for applicants to prepare and submit a proposal for IRSES. Applicants should also consult the relevant legal documents (listed in the Annex 1 of this document) in order to better understand the evaluation process, rules of participation, contractual and financial issues, etc. Proposals are submitted electronically via the Commission's Electronic Proposal Submission Service (EPSS).

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- Researcher's Night (NIGHT)

What does the ''Researchers' night'' consist of? What are its objectives?
The Researchers' night has been launched at European level for the first time in the frame of the ''Researchers in Europe 2005'' Initiative, of which it constituted one of the cornerstones.
o The main objective of the Researchers' night consists of bringing the researchers closer to the large public, allowing for direct exchanges, meetings, interactive activities, and presenting the researchers as ''normal people'' to which the public can identify itself; this will also help convincing more young people to embark on scientific careers.
o The European Commission would intend, whether possible according to the quality of the proposals submitted, to select at least one ''Researchers' night'' per Member Associated State and Candidate Country.

What characteristics should have the projects to be funded?
Researchers' nights regard events of one night duration (for example from 6.00 p.m. to 2.00 a.m.), all taking place on 28 September 2007, with the exception of Israel; o The activities organised during this period of time must contribute to the above objective and could consist of ( non exhaustive list) o Hands-on experiments conducted by researchers o Scientific demonstrations realised by researchers with public participation o Guided visits of labs, research institutions, musea.usually closed to the public particularly at night o ''Real'' scientific experiments to be handled by the public o Workshops for children (realise a robot, realise a real experiment, help a researcher in solving a problem.) o Competitive activities (scientific quizzes, enigma's.) o Drawing competition (amongst the schools of the area concerned)

What specific types of activities are expected to be proposed?
First of all, whichever the very type of activities proposed during the Researchers' night itself, all proposals should include the three following phases:
o Awareness campaign: addressed to the large public, undertaken sufficiently early before the event as to reach as large a target as possible, and relayed by the most efficient communication means (written press, announcements, posters, radio, TV)
o Activities during the night itself
o Impact assessment activities: addressed to the public attending, to the organisers themselves and also to the participating researchers; this should allow a reliable assessment of the actions' impact regarding the public image of researchers and their recognition, and the determination of the most efficient activities in this purpose.

Are there activities indispensable for the qualification as "Researchers' night"?
As a rule, applicants determine themselves the activities they wish to implement on the basis of their specific characteristics/strengths or likely interests of the public targeted, provided that the activities planned fit the Researchers' night concept as defined above. However, all proposals should plan: The direct involvement of researchers having benefited from a European support (Marie curie fellowships, Marie Curie Awards.); The setting up of a European stand corresponding to the requirements described in a separate document accompanying the call for proposals ("specific requirements"); The organisation of a drawing competition "draw a researcher" (minimum requirements included in the document "specific requirements accompanying the call).

Who can participate?
All legal entities, identified either as natural or legal persons considered under national, Community or international law, established in an EU Member or Associated State or Candidate Country in FP7 having legal personality and being entitled to have rights and obligations of any kind in its own name. This might include researchers, research organisations, academia, and companies, including SMEs, public authorities, schools, science musea, parents /teachers associations, private organisations, mobility centres, foundations, and the media.

What is the minimum number of participants?
Coordination and Support actions-support (CSA) may be implemented by a single legal entity. However consortia composed of different stakeholders and in particular involving industrial representatives are welcome and encouraged. The involvement of the major actors of the local/regional/national research community will be considered an asset.

Do the projects require a multinational partnership?
A multinational partnership is not necessary.

What is the average estimated allocated budget to each selected proposal?
Minimum and maximum figures cannot be provided because of the very open nature of the activities that can be organised in the frame of this call. However, it may be estimated that the typical funding for a selected proposal would range between € 20,000 and € 80,000, considering the overall call budget and the number of potentially participating countries. A higher funding could be allocated within budget limits according to the project's needs.

What percentage of funding may be requested?
In the frame of Coordination and Support Actions(Support), the Community grant may amount up to 100 % of the eligible costs. The amount of the grant will depend on the total eligible costs involved in the project. The European Commission however warmly encourages the financial active involvement of local/regional/national stakeholders. As a consequence, adequately co-funded projects demonstrating support by national, regional or local authorities or organisations may be given preference during evaluation.

What should the geographical coverage of each proposal be?
The European Commission would intend to fund at least one Researchers' night per country covered by the present call. The geographical area covered by the actions will be defined by the proposers. Clearly the European Commission encourages proposals including events taking place in different locations within the same country or amongst various countries as being likely to have a larger impact than the more limited ones.

What "average participation" does the Commission expect?
The Commission intends to support projects likely to mobilise a mass participation. Although such notion obviously has to be appreciated according to the area within which the events are to be organised, a target participation of 1-2,000 people per location for the smaller countries and of 5-10,000 people per location for the larger ones could be sensible. The potential impact of the action will however also have to be assessed taking account of other means such TV/radio programmes. For example.

How will the drawing competition precisely work?
Drawing competition will be launched at project's level during the awareness campaign. Organisers are free to launch the competition amongst the three categories of ages defined above or only amongst some of them. The winners will be announced during the
Researchers' nights themselves, which will also offer an exhibition of the different drawings received. The 3-5 best drawings in each category (at least one) will be transmitted to the Commission in order to take part in the European competition.

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- Marie-Curie Awards (AWARDS)

What are Marie Curie Awards?
A Marie Curie Awards is a Prize awarded to a researcher who has reached particularly excellent research results in any scientific field.

Who can apply?
Individual researchers of all nationalities, who have benefited for at least twelve months, from a Marie Curie scheme or similar support from the Community, can apply themselves or be proposed by a third party.

Which research topics are supported?
Proposals from all areas of scientific and technological research of interest to the European
Community are welcome; there are no pre-defined priority areas.

What is the profile of a Prize Holder?
The Prize Holder is a scientist of any nationality who has benefited, at least for one year, from European Community support (Marie Curie scheme or similar) and has achieved a high degree of excellence that deserves a public recognition.

How much funding is foreseen for the Award?
It is intended to award up to five Prizes per year of 50.000 ? each.

How can the Prize money be used?
There are no restrictions on the usage of the Prize money.

What will be expected from the Prize Holder?
The Prize Holder will be expected to participate in public events, which promote and improve the visibility, recognition and attractiveness of European research careers in the context of the European Research Area and contribute to a better understanding of science as an important economic factor, by the broad public.

How to apply?
This Guide contains the essential information for you to prepare and submit a proposal for a Marie Curie Award. You should also consult the relevant legal documents (listed in the
Annex 1 of this document) in order to better understand the evaluation process, rules of participation, contractual and financial issues, etc. Proposals are submitted electronically via the Commission's Electronic Proposal Submission Service (EPSS). Detailed instructions are available in this Guide.

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H E L P D E S K

Questions?

Contact us at http://helpdesk.ekt.gr

 

H I G H L I G H T S

- "Information Leaflet on "PEOPLE" - GREEK [PDF 324KB] 22/12/2006

- CALLS for ''PEOPLE'' programme (CORDIS)

 
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